Question: Where You Had Been Meaning?

Why we use had been?

We can use the past perfect continuous to talk about events which started before a time in the past and which finished, but where the effects or results were still important at a point in the past: It had been raining and the ground was still wet..

What tense is had?

The Past Perfect tense in English is composed of two parts: the past tense of the verb to have (had) + the past participle of the main verb.

Had been doing Meaning?

“Had been doing” is used in past perfect continuous tense. It tells that work/action was started in past and still continued in present. While, “Was doing” is used in past continuous tense which shows that work/action was happening in the past .

Have been meaning to meaning?

First, you are correct; in this context, ‘meaning’ means ‘intending’. As for the tense, we use that tense when we have been wanting to phone Jane for some time now (that’s important – I’ve been meaning to do something implies my intent has persisted for some length of time).

What is the use of had been?

‘had been’ is used with the past perfect and past perfect progressive. Illustration ; Present perfect ‘has/have been ‘ is used when describing an action completed in the recent past and still assumes importance in the present.

Where had you been meaning?

“Where had you been?” is past perfect, and is used to convey a sense of a completed action in the past. In this case, the person we are asking was absent for some event in the past, and we are asking them where they were during that event.

Where have you been or being?

As a rule, the word “been” is always used after “to have” (in any of its forms, e.g., has, had, will have, having). Conversely, the word “being” is never used after “to have.” “Being” is used after “to be” (in any of its forms, e.g., am, is, are, was, were). Examples: I have been busy.

Was been is correct?

*“Were been” is always incorrect. Those two words are never used directly together side by side. “Was” is a simple past tense form of “to be,” used with all pronouns except “you.” (“You were…”) *“Was been” is equally as wrong as *”were been,” if that’s what you’re asking.

What is the difference between was and had been?

Had/has/have been is usually used for something that was done in the past and still applies (multiple events). Was/were usually applies to something done in the past that no longer applies (single event). Example: The well had been producing clean water.

Had been meaning?

All are verb tenses! “Had been” means something began in the past, lasted for some time, then ended. This is entirely in the past. He had been in prison from 1900 to 1914. This verb tense is known as past perfect.

Has been or had been?

“Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

Had been worked meaning?

“She had worked for the previous five years with an advertising company” means that she had worked there for 5 years but was not working there anymore. “She had been working for the previous five years with an advertising company” means that she had worked there for 5 years and was still continuing to work there.

What is the grammar rule for had?

‘Had’ is the past tense of both ‘has’ and ‘have’.have. Have is used with some pronouns and plural nouns: … has. Has is used with the third person singular. … contractions. I have = I’ve. … negative contractions. … ‘have’ and ‘has’ in questions. … ‘have got’ and ‘have’ … ‘have’ and ‘has’ verb tenses. … modal verbs: ‘have to’More items…•

Where have you been all my life meaning?

An expression used to glibly tell someone that they are one’s perfect romantic match, and that one wishes one had met them sooner in life. Often used lightheartedly or sarcastically about people and things alike.

What is the answer for where have you been?

Consider that neither of your given responses directly answers the question of where you have been. A direct answer would be, “In the garden.” Instead, you have (correctly) assumed that the question implies more knowledge than simply your prior location.

Which is or that is?

In a defining clause, use that. In non-defining clauses, use which. Remember, which is as disposable as a sandwich bag. If you can remove the clause without destroying the meaning of the sentence, the clause is nonessential and you can use which.

Where do we use had been?

We use ‘had been’ when you describe something that happened in the past before something else in the past. Also an action that had happened in the past and does not reflect any continuation to the present time. Example: By 500 AD, the Roman Empire had been defeated.